Question: Why Are Geordies So Called?

What does howay mean in Geordie?

The Geordie spelling of the word we all know to mean either ‘come on’ or an exhortation to your chosen football team to perform harder is HOWAY, but it’s commonly misspelled as HAWAY.

Terrifyingly, the latter is actually a Sunderland spelling of a word meaning something very similar..

Why are mackems called Mackems?

Etymology. The expressions date back to the height of Sunderland’s shipbuilding history, as the shipwrights would make the ships, then the maritime pilots and tugboat captains would take them down the River Wear to the sea – the shipyards and port authority being the most conspicuous employers in Sunderland.

Why do Geordies say why aye?

“Why aye, man!” Translation: Yes! A positive, excited or enthusiastic proclamation of agreement.

Why do Geordies say wuh?

A Geordie is a very rare creature in Cambridge. … Not many people are aware of this, but we Geordies say ‘wuh’ for ‘we’ or ‘us’, and ‘iz’ for ‘I’, which is commonly mistaken for ‘us’. For example, ‘she was looking at wuh’ = ‘she was looking at us’.

What does Hinny howay mean?

Howay: An encouraging phrase from Tyneside meaning ‘come on’ – ‘Howay the lads’ is chanted at Newcastle United football matches.

What does Hinny mean in Geordie?

Hinny: Honey – a term of endearment.

What does the name Geordie mean?

Geordie is a variant of the name George and means ‘farmer’. It is also the regional nickname for people from the city of Newcastle Upon Tyne and the surrounding communities and their dialect.

Are Geordies Vikings?

It must be true, the Geordies are modern day Vikings and their unique dialect reflects the rough, uncouth tongue of those not-the-least-bit-boring raiders and settlers of eastern England. … Tyneside sits at the centre of the historical rump of the kingdom of Northumbria that survived the Viking invasions.

Are Geordies friendly?

Meeting & Greeting People The Geordies are super friendly. Please do not be surprised if a stranger starts talking to you in a shop, at a bus stop, or if you are next to them in a queue. A general greeting to a stranger, or shop worker is to use ‘hello’ or ‘hi’.